27
Dec

Seven Lucky Beagle, Harrier-mix Dogs Get a Second Chance Thanks to MSPCA-Nevins Farm

Methuen Center Takes in Scared, Sick and Underweight Dogs; Calls for “New Year” Adopters to Come Forward

Methuen, Mass., Dec. 27, 2016 – Seven scared, ill and underweight Beagle and Harrier-mix dogs who were surrendered after their owner died are set for a bright New Year thanks to the tender loving care they are receiving at the MSPCA-Nevins Farm, officials at the Methuen, Mass.-based animal care and adoption center announced today.

Underweight, Sick and Scared

The dogs, who range in age from five to eight years old and are likely related, were surrendered to the Lakeville, Mass. animal control facility last weekend.  The shelter’s small size and limited staff resources meant the dogs’ veterinary and behavior needs could not be met, and that’s when the MSPCA-Nevins Farm team stepped in to help.

While the MSPCA takes in on average about a dozen beagles every year, it is very rare to receive Harriers—medium-sized hounds more common to the South.  The MSPCA expects that the dogs, all of whom are suffering from Lyme disease, fleas and other health issues, will be very much in demand once recovered.

“We’ll always be here for dogs like these and it’s at these times when our donor support is most appreciated because, without that support, these dogs would never get the care they need to return to excellent health,” said MSPCA-Nevins Farm Director Mike Keiley, who confirmed that the adoption center will spend nearly $3,000 on diagnostics, dental work and other veterinary care before the dogs are placed into new homes.

From Outside to Inside

According to Keiley, the dogs were living outside in kennels that were sufficient to keep the elements out, but lacked the warmth and comfort of a home.  “None of these dogs have ever laid on a couch or napped on a soft rug laid out in the sun—which is something that most of us agree all dogs deserve to have,” said Keiley.

All eight dogs are underweight and all will need extensive dental work—in addition to treatment for Lyme disease.  “They may never have seen a veterinarian in their lives, so we’re going to ensure they get very thorough examinations and care,” added Keiley.

Six-year-old Harrier Pauli’s condition appears most serious.  She has a heart murmur deemed very serious by the MSPCA staff and has mammary masses that may require surgical removal.

Keiley stressed the need for both donors as well as prospective adopters to step forward and help create a brighter future for the dogs.   “Monetary donations are very important in these times given just how many animals need not just sheltering, but costly veterinary care.”

Adopters Wanted!
Most challenging for the Nevins Farm team—and for the dogs’ eventual adopters—is the fact that the dogs have lived outside their entire lives and patience will be required as the dogs transition to a life indoors.  Keiley believes the dogs will do very well with crate training (a proven strategy for housebreaking) and some basic obedience training, all of which the MSPCA-Nevins Farm offers onsite.

Interested adopters are encouraged to visit the MSPCA-Nevins Farm Animal Care and Adoption Center at Care and Adoption Center at 400 Broadway, Methuen or visit www.mspca.org for more information.

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The MSPCA-Angell is a national and international leader in animal protection and veterinary medicine and provides direct hands-on care for thousands of animals each year. Founded in 1868, it is the second-oldest humane society in the United States. Services include animal protection and adoption, advocacy, humane education, law enforcement, and world-class veterinary care. The MSPCA-Angell is a private, non-profit organization. It does not receive any government funding nor is it funded or operated by any national humane organization. The MSPCA-Angell relies solely on the support and contributions of individuals who care about animals. Please visit www.mspca.org.